"Can gum disease lead to Alzheimer’s?"

Q: I’ve heard that gum disease can eventually lead to Alzheimer’s disease. Is this true?

A: Recent research suggests that gum inflammation can eventually lead to dangerous inflammation in the brain.

According to a study conducted by researchers at New York University, gum disease may increase the risk of cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The team studied 20 years of data from Denmark and found that among test subjects who were over the age of 70, those who had gum disease were 9 times more likely to test in the lower range of brain function than those without gum disease.

Follow up studies still need to be done on the study to be certain of the link between Alzheimer’s Disease and tooth decay. However, when studies keep showing a link to the health of your teeth to your overall health, I think it’s time to start brushing and flossing!

Dr. Natalie Khadavi
sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: I’m concerned about the radiation in dental x-rays. How radioactive are they?

A: Radiation is a scary concept for many people, making us think of cancer and mutation.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

"Is there a link between asthma and tooth decay?"

Q: I’ve heard that there’s a link between asthma and tooth decay. Is this true?

A: According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, there does not appear to be a link between asthma and tooth decay. In fact, it turns out that children with asthma tend to have fewer cavities than children without asthma. Dr. Gerardo Maupome, one of the authors of the study, believes that this may be because many asthmatic children see doctors frequently, including dentists, so their teeth are better maintained than those of children without asthma.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: Are wisdom teeth a potential source of stem cells?

A: Yes. In 2008, Japanese scientists confirmed that wisdom teeth can be used to harvest stem cells. Stem cells hold the potential to treat many diseases, but so far most stem cells have been harvested from embryos, a practice that has been very controversial. Stem cells harvested from wisdom teeth avoid any ethical issues.

While this is a very promising development, there are still years of research ahead before doctors can begin to use stem cells harvested from wisdom teeth to treat disease.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: Do the vampires on True Blood have their fangs on the wrong teeth?

A: If you’ve watched the HBO series True Blood and the fangs of the vampires looked a little strange to you, it’s probably because the vampires have their fangs on their lateral teeth. Most vampires in movies and on TV have their fangs on their canines – which makes sense, since this is where dogs, cats and many other animals have their fangs.
This article looks at the history of vampire fangs in scary movies and shows, and it examines why the creators of True Blood made their vampire fangs the way they did. (Note that some of the content on that site – like True Blood itself – may not be appropriate for children.)
Dr. Natalie Khadavi
sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

css.php