"Are infected gums always red?"

Q: My gums are very sore and maybe a little swollen, but they’re not red at all. Do infected gums have to be red?
A: Infected gums are usually red or purple, but not always. The only way to know for sure what’s happening with your gums is to get them evaluated by a dental professional. If you come by our office, we’ll be glad to take a look.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: I’m a young adult, but I still have one of my baby teeth. It’s in the front and it’s causing my other teeth to crowd together, but it’s not loose and I don’t want to have it pulled because there would be a visible gap in my smile. What can I do?
A: Sometimes baby teeth do stick around into adulthood, and when they do they can cause a lot of problems.

A situation like yours needs to be evaluated to decide what treatment is best. It might call for removing the baby tooth and then using braces to bring your other teeth into proper alignment. In some cases, your permanent tooth might be missing. Then the tooth would be replaced with options like an implant, a bridge, or a partial. In either case, yes, you would have a gap in your smile for a while, but you will be much better off in the long run. Your teeth will no longer be crowded together, and your smile will look better with your one baby tooth out of the picture and your adult teeth settled into their proper position.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Brushing your child’s teeth

Recently we visited the YWCA in Santa Monica to speak to a group of parents about caring for their children’s teeth. In this video we discuss how you can brush a child’s teeth for them, if they refuse to brush themselves.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

What does "long in the tooth" mean?

Q: Recently I heard somebody described as “long in the tooth.” What does that mean?
A: If people neglect their gum care, as they get older their gums will recede, making their teeth look longer. So saying somebody is “long in the tooth” is another way of calling them old.

According to some sources, we get this expression from the practice of looking at a horse’s teeth to estimate the animal’s age. A horse’s teeth continue to grow as they age, so an older horse will have longer teeth than a younger horse.

The first recorded use of the phrase in English comes from Thackeray’s The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. in 1852: “His cousin was now of more than middle age, and had nobody’s word but her own for the beauty which she said she once possessed. She was lean, and yellow, and long in the tooth; all the red and white in all the toy-shops in London could not make a beauty of her.”

Getting older is inevitable, but getting “long in the tooth” isn’t! Take care of your gums and teeth, and you can prevent this visible sign of aging.
Dr. Natalie Khadavi
sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: My kids think it doesn’t really matter if they brush now, because someday their baby teeth will just be replaced by adult teeth anyway. Does it really matter if baby teeth decay?

A: It’s very important to prevent tooth decay, even in baby teeth (AKA primary or deciduous teeth.) It may not be necessary to fill a small cavity in a baby tooth if the tooth will soon be lost, but it’s a different matter if it’s a baby tooth that could last for years. Cavities can hurt just as much in baby teeth as in permanent teeth, and untreated infections can become dangerous. Your children’s permanent teeth develop right under their baby teeth, so tooth decay can affect the growing adult teeth along with the baby teeth. Also, the baby teeth serve as placeholders for the adult teeth, so if the baby teeth fall out too soon, the adult teeth may grow in crooked or may even become stuck in the bone unable to come out at all in the case of impacted teeth.

It’s essential to teach your children proper oral hygiene now, so they will grow up knowing how to take care of their teeth for the rest of their lives. Check their teeth after they’ve brushed and flossed to make sure they’re doing it correctly, and take them to the dentist for regular cleanings.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

css.php