Cavity Crusade: Dental Evolved is a free, fast-paced dental game for kids, and you can play it online without having to download anything. Check it out by clicking here.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees children and adults in Culver City and serves the greater Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Oral cancer is a frightening and potentially fatal disease, but your chances of survival are greatly increased if you catch it early. In this video, actor and oral cancer survivor Jack Klugman talks about the importance of early detection.

Consult your dentist or visit our office soon for a thorough evaluation.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: I smoke cigars, and I have a lot of dental problems. If I switch to cigarettes, will that help improve my dental health?

A: Cigarettes and cigars are both very damaging – not just for your teeth, but for your overall health. Cigar and cigarette smokers are at risk for gum disease, mouth and throat cancer and many other diseases.

According to the American Dental Association, tobacco use could be responsible for as much as 75% of adult gum disease. Tobacco damages the attachment of soft tissue and bone to your teeth. Cigarettes and cigars also cause bad breath and stains on your tongue and teeth.

If you want to improve your oral health, stop smoking today! Cigars and cigarettes are bad for you and bad for those around you who are unlucky enough to inhale.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: What does it mean why you say somebody is “long in the tooth”?
A: Saying somebody is “long in the tooth” is another way of calling them old.

When people neglect their gum care, as they get older their gums can recede and make their teeth look longer.

Some sources report that the expression comes from the old practice of looking at a horse’s teeth to estimate the animal’s age. (This practice also gave rise to the expression, “Never look a gift horse in the mouth.”) A horse’s teeth will continue to grow as the horse ages, so the teeth of an older horse will be longer than the teeth of a younger horse.

The first known use of the phrase in English comes from Thackeray’s The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. in 1852: “His cousin was now of more than middle age, and had nobody’s word but her own for the beauty which she said she once possessed. She was lean, and yellow, and long in the tooth; all the red and white in all the toy-shops in London could not make a beauty of her.”

Getting older is inevitable, but getting “long in the tooth” doesn’t have to be! If you take care of your teeth and gums, you can prevent this visible sign of aging.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi
sees patients in the Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

Q: My dentist says I have cavities that show on my x-rays, but he can’t see them when he looks in my mouth. How does that work?

A: Cavities that begin in between your teeth (also known as interproximal decay) show up only on the radiographs (x-rays) at first. They are not visible in the mouth until a large amount of your tooth is destroyed. Daily flossing is essential to help avoid this type of cavity.

Dr. Natalie Khadavi sees patients in the westside Los Angeles area. Visit our website or give us a call at (310) 482-3971 for more information about how we can provide you and your family with healthy smiles that last a lifetime.

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